Spiking Cancer One Volley at a Time

Volley for the Cure is a HUGE Success at West geauga

One+Human+Ribbon+to+fight+Cancer

One Human Ribbon to fight Cancer

On Monday, October 10th, from 5 to 8 p.m., West Geauga High School’s volleyball team hosted Volley for the Cure in an effort to show our support for the fight versus cancer.

The Wickliffe Blue Devils, Monday’s opponent, also participated by wearing pink t-shirts. The teams wore pink jerseys…actually the West Geauga girls were given a special raspberry pink jersey (the libero’s were white w/ pink numbers) that had to be returned…pink socks, and hair ribbons as part of the event. Players from both teams were also given the opportunity to honor someone over the microphone who was affected by cancer before the varsity game, as they announced the names of those affected by the disease.

One in every 330 Americans develops cancer before the age twenty. The lady Wolverines honored those who have been affected by cancer with the “Volley for the Cure” game. West Geauga parent, Mrs. Leslie Stanforth, organized the event. Mrs. Stanforth chose to be in charge of Volley for the Cure because it was an opportunity to engage our athletes in philanthropy, to unite the school and players in a common goal, and to promote the WG spirit. Mrs. Stanforth said, “It was nice for the girls to come together and support the cause to fight against cancer.”

In addition to the game, many of the players’ families contributed by cooking food and bringing dessert to sell during the game at the concession stand. The admission to the game was free, but the team accepted donations in lieu of an admission charge. West Geauga athletic director, Mr. Joe Leonette, waived the admission charge in order to have the money donated to the event’s profits. He said, “We were more than happy to waive the admission charge for the game in order to support an event as important as breast cancer research.”

Overall, the event raised $873.45, with all of the money being donated to the National Breast Cancer Foundation. Junior Jill Jevnikar said, “I’ve recently experienced how cancer can affect a family because I know someone who was diagnosed and how they struggle every day.”